Photo: Downingtown's Trestle Bridge

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Photo: Downingtown's Trestle Bridge

Postby jcw122 » Sun Mar 09, 2008 1:21 am

Hi everyone!

I just found this bridge recently, and I'm in love with it! It's high, and long and just gorgeous. I've been Googling all night to find out and learn more about the line it used to be on (the Glen Loch to Thorndale).

So I'm glad I found this forum, and thought I'd post up a photo I took of it recently! It was taken from street level.


Image
By jcw122

I have some photos of the Whitford bridge also, but I can't find them at the moment, hopefully I'll take some better ones soon anyway. Both bridges are incredible!

BTW, can anyone comment on the legality of going on the path that used to be the Glen Loch to Thorndale?
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Postby scotty269 » Sun Mar 09, 2008 10:40 am

That is quite amazing
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Postby Red Arrow Fan » Mon Mar 10, 2008 10:55 pm

I drive under this every weekday to and from work!

Occasionally, an early-1900's postcard view of this is for sale on Ebay (search for Downingtown).
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Re: Photo: Downingtown's Trestle Bridge

Postby chevymtrsport » Sat Oct 31, 2009 11:59 pm

the line was used by the pennsylvania railroad until pennsy became part of conrail. conrail used it until probably 1991. growing up i used to be able to watch the trains go by while in school, or see idle trains along the route while riding the bus. i was even up on the bridge with a friend once when a trail was coming westward towards us. it was a mad dash to get off it in time! regretfully, i never got any photos of a conrail train crossing the bridge, and have been looking for some for ages now. the tracks are ripped up, except in a few small locations. i've been on the bridge a few times since it was abandoned, and i have alot of pictures from up on it.
the last time i was up there, the line was decently cleared of brush overgrowth, and i'd love to see a trail made of it for bike riding. unfortunately, with the build-up around the former line, i think it would take an act of God, or a time capsule to see a train cross that bridge again. it breaks my heart to know the best days of the bridge's history seems to be behind it. i would be gald to share my pics if anyone is interested. my email address is chevymtrsport@yahoo.com. please put "downingtown trestle bridge" in the subjest heading, so i know not to simply delete the email.
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Re: Photo: Downingtown's Trestle Bridge

Postby ljemmett » Thu Jan 20, 2011 5:25 pm

Would this be the bridge that would have been referred to as simply the Downingtown bridge? I have an old newspaper article in which my second great grandfather, who was a conductor for the Penna. railroad, met with an accident while crossing the "Downington Bridge." It says he fell through the timbers and fell to the ground below, nearly ending his life. This was in May 1862.
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Re: Photo: Downingtown's Trestle Bridge

Postby PARailWiz » Fri Jan 21, 2011 7:19 pm

I have been told that when Conrail abandoned the line, they considered removing that bridge but could not figure out how to get it down safely, let alone at a reasonable price.
The picture to the right is a photo of Silverliner I 246 located at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasburg, PA.
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Re: Photo: Downingtown's Trestle Bridge

Postby Bobinchesco » Fri Jan 21, 2011 7:34 pm

Would this be the bridge that would have been referred to as simply the Downingtown bridge? I have an old newspaper article in which my second great grandfather, who was a conductor for the Penna. railroad, met with an accident while crossing the "Downington Bridge." It says he fell through the timbers and fell to the ground below, nearly ending his life. This was in May 1862.

Not likely. The photo shown, of what is usually referred to as the “high bridge,” is on the P&T branch, south of town, and was constructed in 1904. More likely would be the bridge over the Brandywine Creek on the original main line. This bridge is currently of concrete construction, but was probably timber in 1862.
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