Porters

Discussion of steam locomotives from all manufacturers and railroads

Moderators: slide rules, Typewriters

Porters

Postby pburgher » Mon Jan 17, 2005 5:04 pm

Came across an old H.K. Porter catalog and got interested as I am refugee from the 'burgh (Go Steelers) and particularly because my dad had his office in the H.K Porter Building dahntahn.

Anyhow it is a reprint of H. K. Porter 13th Edition Steam Loco catalog. I am trying to figure out the original date of issue. It must be at least 1917 and before 1922.

Anyone know? Thanks
pburger
pburgher
 

Postby Aa3rt » Tue Jan 25, 2005 4:39 pm

pburgher-while I'm afraid I can't help you date your catalog, I did find this aritcle on Porters that may help:

http://www.catskillarchive.com/rrextra/porter.Html
Art Audley, AA3RT
Moderator: Railroad Radio & Communications, Railroads in Books, Magazines, Music, TV and other Media, General Discussion: Fallen Trolley & Interurban Lines, General Discussion: Shortline, Industrial & Military Railroads,
User avatar
Aa3rt
 
Posts: 869
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2004 8:09 pm
Location: La Plata, MD, MP 38.8 on the Pope's Creek sub

Thanks

Postby pburgher » Tue Jan 25, 2005 7:17 pm

Thanks for the tip - I had just bumped ino that one too
pburger
pburgher
 

Postby WM 303 » Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:04 pm

Speaking of Porters, how many of those little locomotives still exist? Is the "fireless cooker" the same thing?

I remember reading about Porters in a book I have about the Western Maryland. I am not steam literate, so please indulge me a little. How can you make steam without a fire?
WM 303
 

Postby Aa3rt » Sun Apr 10, 2005 6:36 pm

WM 303-While I have no idea how many "fireless" locomotives still exist, I can supply you with a little information. The "fireless" locomotive was usually used in an industrial setting where steam was a product (or by-product) of the industrial operation. The fireless engine was basically a thermos bottle on wheels. Steam was taken from the industrial boiler and used to charge the engine. Then the locomotive could be used until pressure ran low, when it would be recharged again. Because the engine needed to be recharged on a regular basis while in use, they did not venture too far from the source of steam.

Fireless locomotives were built by Porter, Heisler and possibly a couple of others. The largest fireless locomotive ever built was an 0-8-0, currently on display at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania.

For more information, check out the following links:

From the Steamtown website, a history on Public Service Electric and Gas Company's number 6816 and more information on fireless locomotives.

http://www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/steamtown/shs2q.htm

From Northeast Railfan.Net, a photo gallery of fireless and compressed air locomotives:

http://www.northeast.railfan.net/steam21.html

Porter built conventional steam locomotives in a number of wheel arrangements as well.
Art Audley, AA3RT
Moderator: Railroad Radio & Communications, Railroads in Books, Magazines, Music, TV and other Media, General Discussion: Fallen Trolley & Interurban Lines, General Discussion: Shortline, Industrial & Military Railroads,
User avatar
Aa3rt
 
Posts: 869
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2004 8:09 pm
Location: La Plata, MD, MP 38.8 on the Pope's Creek sub

Postby WM 303 » Sun Apr 10, 2005 7:21 pm

Thanks for the information. Fascinating little creatures, to say the least. A sure cure for today's Nimbys.
WM 303
 


Return to Steam Locomotives

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests