New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Pertaining to all railroading subjects, past and present, in New England

Moderators: MEC407, NHN503

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby ferroequinarchaeologist » Fri Apr 29, 2016 11:21 am

>>Does a Senate committee have the authority to reinstate the $4m phase without House support?

No. Not only would it require House approval, it also would require the approval of the Executive Council.

PBM
ferroequinarchaeologist
 
Posts: 531
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2004 8:12 pm
Location: Darkest Atkinson, NH

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby NRGeep » Thu May 05, 2016 8:25 am

Do the chief legislative opponents of any and all commuter rail to Nashua and Manchester recieve pork from Concord Coach?
NRGeep
 
Posts: 988
Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2004 9:33 pm

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby Arlington » Thu May 05, 2016 9:31 am

All evidence is that they are good, honest representatives. In most places its simply that they completely operate within the "driving = freedom" paradigm and can't see "people" (by which they mean adult drivers) being made more free by spending on non-auto modes. When you can't picture a world in which you or somebody you know might take a train, you can't see how train spending can ever be anything but a net loss for your world and way of life.

State Motto: Drive free or die.
"Trying to solve congestion by making roadways wider is like trying to solve obesity by buying bigger pants."--Charles Marohn
Arlington
 
Posts: 3273
Joined: Wed Jun 02, 2004 7:51 am
Location: Medford MA (was Arlington MA and Arlington VA)

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby gokeefe » Thu May 05, 2016 10:14 am

I think that is a very accurate and succinct description of how people in New Hampshire view passenger rail (and most other forms of public transit).
gokeefe
User avatar
gokeefe
 
Posts: 9835
Joined: Sat Feb 16, 2008 12:28 pm
Location: Winthrop, Maine

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby jaymac » Thu May 05, 2016 11:07 am

...wouldn't be too surprised if there isn't an element of feeling -- as opposed to thinking -- that trains are a Massachusetts and/or Massachusetts-lite (not far enough north of the border) priority...
"A white SUV with a roof antenna just might not be a company van."
jaymac
 
Posts: 3419
Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 1:08 pm

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby NRGeep » Thu May 05, 2016 12:00 pm

Arlington wrote:All evidence is that they are good, honest representatives. In most places its simply that they completely operate within the "driving = freedom" paradigm and can't see "people" (by which they mean adult drivers) being made more free by spending on non-auto modes. When you can't picture a world in which you or somebody you know might take a train, you can't see how train spending can ever be anything but a net loss for your world and way of life.

State Motto: Drive free or die.


I don't doubt that. On second thought, Concord Coach recieves subsidies from the state of New Hampshire that potential commuter rail could only dream of.
NRGeep
 
Posts: 988
Joined: Tue Sep 28, 2004 9:33 pm

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby newpylong » Fri May 06, 2016 4:07 pm

The subsidies that go to Concord Coach wouldn't even cover painting the new train stations. Rail service is exponentially more expensive to operate than bus service. Concord coach funds close to 80% of their operations from fares. What is the number for Keolis?
newpylong
 
Posts: 3940
Joined: Thu Jun 28, 2007 12:32 pm
Location: NH

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby NHV 669 » Fri May 06, 2016 4:57 pm

Seeing the amount of people that get on at 6am all the way up here in Littleton at the northern terminus, I'd say there's more than enough money being made to keep this bus going. And it's only a single bus each way daily, I believe. Not much there to subsidize there.
Casey
Living near right-of-ways since 1989. Old haunts include: childhood sightings of 669 being the last to "de-rust" the Berlin branch, late 90's summers trackside at the Wagon Wheel of Biddeford, ME, White River Junction, VT, Oneonta, NY, Colorado Springs, CO, and Santa Barbara, CA.
User avatar
NHV 669
 
Posts: 427
Joined: Sat Feb 08, 2014 11:07 pm
Location: Just east of Scott Jct. on the Mountain Division

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby Jackinbox1 » Sat Sep 10, 2016 10:53 am

To get on topic, I've been looking at more stuff about the Capitol Corridor, and I find it funny that there are many things that have said:
"This will help take traffic off of highways, such as I-93..."
Hahahahah, no. If the M&L couldn't take enough cars of I-93 to warrant it, how in the world would the NH Main do it for I-93? I could see it taking cars off of Route 3, and maybe some parts of I-93, but the really congested parts are left basically untouched, to my understanding.
Arguing with someone on the internet is like playing chess with a pigeon: No matter what you do, the opponent will always take a dump on the board and strut about like it won something.
Jackinbox1
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Thu Nov 05, 2015 3:03 pm
Location: Windham, New Hampshire

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby F-line to Dudley via Park » Mon Sep 12, 2016 8:05 am

Umm...what highway does the Cap Corridor parallel from Manchester to Concord? It's all that traffic converging onto 93 between the I-89 and I-293/NH 101 interchanges that get directly addressed by the Cap Corridor. That is a larger share of total 93 traffic to/from the MA border than what originates purely from Derry to MA 213 in Methuen. Those numbers aren't subject to interpretation because population density is simply an order or magnitude greater between the Airport station catchment area and Concord than it is points south on the M&L.

Now, there's a reason why you can draw the line of the MBTA district's intra-district constituency at downtown Nashua...and that is all about Route 3. But the T and NHDOT have very different selfish reasons for needing/wanting this, and the dividing line for that is the Airport where the Route 3 corridor gives way to I-93. Which is why there's been no MBTA locals proposed that go anywhere north of Manchester (or...now, the Nashua-goes-it-alone fallback). Concord service would be an additional layer that runs local in NH, express in MA to only Lowell and Anderson RTC. The difference in highway corridors served north vs. south of Manchester and what that means to each state is big reason why the ultimate build is probably going to result in that kind of service layering rather than one local schedule to rule all.
F-line to Dudley via Park
 
Posts: 7197
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 7:26 pm
Location: North Cambridge

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby Jackinbox1 » Wed Sep 14, 2016 8:12 pm

That's 18 miles out of a 189 mile highway. The statement might have meant the part between Manchester and Concord, but it didn't necessarily specify.
Arguing with someone on the internet is like playing chess with a pigeon: No matter what you do, the opponent will always take a dump on the board and strut about like it won something.
Jackinbox1
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Thu Nov 05, 2015 3:03 pm
Location: Windham, New Hampshire

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby leviramsey » Wed Sep 14, 2016 8:26 pm

A substantial proportion of the traffic on 93 south of Manchester is originating between Manchester and Concord. Taking a trip originating from there from 93 to the train takes a vehicle off 93 for the whole 20-40 miles of 93 south of Manchester/Concord.
leviramsey
 
Posts: 325
Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2015 12:12 pm

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby leviramsey » Wed Sep 14, 2016 9:32 pm

Back-of-the-envelope calculation using a standard gravitational model, about for every 10 cars on 93 bound for Boston crossing the state line originating from Salem, Windham, or Londonderry, there are 11 cars bound for Boston from Manchester, Hooksett, Bow, and Concord. In both cases, of course, the Boston-bound traffic is dwarfed by traffic going elsewhere (e.g. places along 495), but neither the NH Main nor the M&L is going to be a viable option for any of those drivers. Lowell - Nashua - Manchester - Concord probably takes at least as much traffic off 93 in terms of cars at the state line, and takes far more traffic off of 93 in terms of trip-miles with far less capital expenditure and probably generally better farebox recovery (Nashua and Lowell are better intermediate destinations than Salem, Methuen, and Lawrence: it's a lot more likely that someone will get on in Concord or Manchester and get off in Lowell than in Lawrence, and interzone fares like that more or less go straight to the bottom line.
leviramsey
 
Posts: 325
Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2015 12:12 pm

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby Balerion » Wed Nov 02, 2016 10:09 am

What The Election Could Mean For Commuter Rail In Southern N.H.

A look at how the upcoming election could affect this project's prospects. Of course, the response to the title of the article is most likely "not much", unless the legislature changes its tune.
Balerion
 
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Sep 14, 2015 12:57 pm

Re: New Hampshire Commuter Rail Discussion

Postby b&m 1566 » Thu Nov 03, 2016 7:50 am

Being from NH, I wish I could get a list of the candidates who are running, that are for commuter rail. Nearly 75% of the people that live-in NH are for commuter rail and yet the politicians we elect, keep voting it down. They're supposed to act on behalf of the voters but as we all know, that never happens... in any state.
b&m 1566
 
Posts: 2850
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2004 2:09 am
Location: Hudson, NH

PreviousNext

Return to New England Railfan

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests